Buckwheat Groats

Tonight, I got to enjoy a treat I rarely eat:  buckwheat groats. Here I am revealing my Soviet upbringing again, but buckwheat porridge is one of the key dishes of Russian cuisine.

This is what buckwheat groats looks like raw:

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They might look familiar to you if you’ve ever eaten kasha in any form (random bit of trivia: kasha is actually the Russian word for porridge).  The difference between buckwheat groats and kasha is that kasha is toasted and groats are raw.  You cook them like rice: 1 part groats to 2 parts water.  Put in a small pot, cover, bring to a boil and then put on the lowest flame you can.  It will take about 20 to 30 minutes for them to cook.  Here’s what they look like done:

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The traditional Russian way to eat them is with a bit of butter, salt and a glass of milk.  You can veganize that by substituting a good margarine and some soy milk. Mark talks about other buckwheat groat recipes in his book.

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But sometimes the simplest thing is the best.  Buckwheat is an excellent whole grain, has tons of vitamins, minerals and lots of protein.  Enjoy!

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